Kay Francis

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Va-Va-Villainess: Majorie Gateson

Published October 15, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

One of the most elegant supporting players in the early talkies, Majorie Gateson added a superiorly venomous flair to 1932’s Street of Women. Forcing the film’s romantic lead, played by Alan Dinehart, to remain in their loveless marriage for the benefit of her social standing and the maintenance of her lifestyle, she is rich presence onscreen – often stealing the focus with an oily disdain.

Nicely, Gateson’s co-stars here include Warners Brothers’ original diva Kay Francis, who would go onto play a role similar to Gateson’s in 1939’s In Name Only, and Gloria Stuart. Stuart, gained mega latter-day fame for her Academy nominated work in James Cameron’s Titanic, but spent her early career highlighting such classic horror fare as The Old Dark House and The Invisible Man. Gateson, herself, received some sunset significance by playing the revered matriarch for fourteen years on the long running soap opera The Secret Storm.

Horror Hall of Fame: Gateson added her elegant essence to such early fright offerings as Fog and Thirteen Women. She also notably appeared as an endangered widow in the Wisteria Cottage episode of the anthology series Suspense.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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(Photos: Above, top: Street of Women cover art with Gateson reacting imperviously in the lower right. Above, bottom: Gateson bringing a somber dignity to Conrad Janis” threats on Suspense.)

Va-Va-Villainess: Kay Francis

Published January 4, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Kay Francis In Name Only 2

Her specialized take on honorable, suffering women made the distinguished Kay Francis one of the highest paid female stars of the ‘30s. Considered to be “as a responsive as a violin” (by none other than William Powell), Francis used this versatility to expand her career as that decade came to a close.

Kay Francis In Name OnlyCast as Cary Grant’s manipulative wife in 1939’s In Name Only, Francis’ Maida Walker was a woman who could – and did – drive men to suicide. Subtly maneuvering the family of Grant’s unhappy Alec into her corner, Francis’ character almost destroys his future with Carole Lombard’s loving and artistic Julie Eden. A final confrontation with Julie reveals Maida’s true motivations to all, though, and Francis slinks off with shocked elegance at the film’s close out. Subtly underplaying her character’s flint hard anger, Francis shines with sense of brittle control mixed with an acidic softness here, allowing the audience to feel a bit of sympathy for her while also delighting in her downfall. Kay Francis Allotment Wives

Taking the vengefulness of Maida a step further, Francis’ dominating Sheila Seymour is a crime boss extraordinaire in 1945’s Allotment Wives. The head of a ring of women determined to milk soldiers of their savings, Francis is coldly charming once again here. Even when gunning down her opposition in cold blood, Francis shines with a hypnotic allure. As with In Name Only, Francis connects fully with the character’s emotional softness, manifested by this character’s beloved daughter, allowing the audience to feel a twinge of compassion for her actions even when they are homicidal in nature.

Kay Francis Allotment Wives 2.jpg

While not as well remembered as Bette Davis, her professional rival at Warner Brothers, Francis still has her devoted fans and a number of books and a website dedicated to her career and life.

www.kayfrancisfilms.com/

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan

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