Television

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Dagger Cast: DemonHuntr

Published February 4, 2022 by biggayhorrorfan

It’s time to get out those glazed donuts…you’re not going shirtless, right?!?!…and dive into the latest episode of Dagger Cast!! Here we speak with Tim O’ Leary, creator of Demonhuntr, an incredibly diverse, sex positive horror show (in the vein of Buffy & Dante’s Cove). New episodes of the series are debuting on Here TV on Fridays throughout February — and it was a true phantasmagorical thrill to speak with Tim about the challenges and joys of creating independent content and, most especially, flipping the script on the patriarchal expectations of straight horror.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan

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Flashback: Crystal Gayle Meets the Sin Stalker

Published January 18, 2022 by biggayhorrorfan

“That was a very naughty song, Crystal! You should be more careful” – The Sin Stalker

Once upon a time, the powers-that-be at Another World conspired to make country goddess Crystal Gayle the final girl with the longest tresses ever! In the spring of 1987, Gayle, who was a huge fan of the daytime drama, guest starred on the show for a week. While she performed plenty of musical numbers during her stay in Bay City, the producers also worked this raven-haired singer into a major plotline by making her a target of the Sin Stalker, a ghoulish entity who was terrorizing women that struck him as being anything less than moral.

Finding some of Gayle’s sweet pop ballads a bit too suggestive, the peeved stalker wrote her threatening letters, spied on her in her dressing room bathtub and eventually, disturbed beyond all measure, went in for an aggressive kill. But this momma fixated psychopath should have known better than to count this satin voiced yet rough-hewn country gal out. Fighting back with a ferocity, this slasher reminiscent scenario found Gayle leading the killer through a myriad of unoccupied hallways and backrooms of the hotel she was booked in – trying to, desperately, escape him. Her extremely luxurious locks floating, spirit like, in her wake, she eventually clobbered the killer with a fire extinguisher. Momentarily stunned, this malicious entity was, ultimately, scared off by the arrival of Adam Cory (Ed Fry), the show’s handsome police detective. Determined not to let this lurid attack offset her life, Gayle rounded out her run on the program by performing its new theme song with her duet partner, fellow hit maker and future Broadway star Gary Morris.

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“I’m going to sing. No one’s going to get the best of me!” – Crystal Gayle

Nicely accentuated by the participation of a sweet character named Lisa Grady (Phantoms’ Joanna Going), a young psychic with a strange connection to the demented marauder, the story developed further horror film references as it continued. Much like Psycho, the twisted exterminator here was soon being egged on by the voice of his dead mother, a demented audio presence that encouraged him to kill. Unfortunately for dedicated viewers, a surprise victim of those sadistic monologues was one of the show’s elegant, longstanding citizens, Quinn Harding (Petronia Paley). Thankfully, while devotees mourned her departure, the talented Paley later found work on Guiding Light, playing the matriarchal Vivian Grant for 7 years in the ‘90s.

“Good boy! You knew she was living with that lawyer.” – The Sin Stalker’s Mother after Harding’s Murder.

Happily, for the curious, portions of this macabre undertaking, including the entirety of Gayle’s run, can be found on YouTube.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Getting Fearless with Freddy’s Nightmares’ Magnetic Liz Keifer

Published November 29, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

This past summer, I was asked to do a Freddy’s Nightmares retrospective for Grave Face Records annual Halloween magazine. This assignment gave me the chance to talk with actress Liz Keifer, who played the dual role of Kim/Tania on a second season episode of the anthology series entitled Interior Loft. Keifer, best known for playing Blake Marler on Guiding Light, was an eclectic soap hopper, playing everything from the heroic best friend to misunderstood villainesses on a variety of shows (General Hospital, One Life to Live, The Young and the Restless, Days of our Lives) with zest and skill. She also brought her empathetic flair to a multitude of iconic nighttime programs like Full House and Married…with Children. During our conversation about her work on Nightmares, we dove into the psychological underpinnings of the character she played, a young author whose husband encourages her to record messages for a sexually oriented 1-800 number. It was a fascinating and important chat about the emotional truth of that role and how abusive that relationship reads now in a (hopefully) more enlightened age. Since only a portion of the chat was used for its original intent, I decided to reproduce the entirety of our heart-to-heart here for everyone’s enjoyment. It should give you much to think about, particularly in how genre work can provide a much deeper context to our lives than may be immediately apparent.

BGHF: Hi Liz! I am so excited to talk with you about this. What are your first thoughts when you revisit your experience working on Freddy’s Nightmares?

LK: I remember an intense two weeks of shooting. Wow! That was a lot. I remember the continuity people trying to keep track of who I was. Was I the character in the book? Who was I? …and all the different men who kept coming through…and the killing!

B: Ha! Your character certainly did some of that! Were you aware of the A Nightmare on Elm Street phenomenon at the time of filming?

L: No. I wasn’t. I was aware of the films. I had not seen them in the movie theaters. When did the films come out?

B: The first one was in the mid-80s. Then with the sequels in the late ’80s and early ’90s, they really took on a cultural momentum.

L: Yeah. I kind of missed that. I don’t know what was going on. I was off busy doing musicals or something!

B: Soaps! You were doing soap operas!

L: Yeah. I was doing soaps. (laughs) I was busy learning lines. So, I was not aware of the huge impact. I just remember the breakdown for the character. They were looking for a Michelle Pfeiffer type. They wanted somebody who could play a dual role. I was like – They are never going to cast me. I remember thinking that. But…I seemed to do that well throughout my twenties, playing the dual personality. The good girl-bad girl. I can go both places and I seem to have made a career out of playing a good girl who did bad things. (laughs) I got away with a lot.

B: Blake on Guiding Light always seemed to be messing up her relationships, sleeping with the wrong person…

L: Yeah… but with good intentions always. Like the nun (on General Hospital) who was psychotic…going crazy, falling in love with her brother!

B: Well…speaking as a very, very lapsed Catholic, I believe to be a nun, there has to be a little psychosis present, no matter what the circumstances!

L: (Laughing) This is a true. It really wasn’t a far stretch. So, no, back to your question I really wasn’t aware. I was just interested in the meatiness of the role.

B: Which there is plenty of! So, how did you approach the more sensitive aspects of the role? There is a lot going on there.  

L: We all knew we were telling a story. It starts with that – plus I have to say, what the outside never sees, is the crew. There is always a huge crew there. And for the most part, most crews have been really supportive…and for some reason, I have been able to magnetize really great sets – sets where crew guys are almost protective of me. I’ve really been lucky that way. I do remember that there was this humorous game going on with this particular crew. I think it’s called clipping. I think that’s the name for it. It’s when you take the clothes pins that they use for their equipment, to clip wires together and that type of thing. It’s part of the tool kit for the crew, the camera guys…the sound guys. But the object was to clip people’s backs – to get the pins onto their wardrobe or their clothes without them knowing – to do it with a sense of stealth. During rehearsals, one day, they managed to put three of them on my back and I didn’t know! Nobody said anything. But after a while, I was feeling this kind of energy – like I’m in on a joke, but I don’t know what the joke is. It was this game to see how many clips that they could clip to the back of my sweater. That made me one of the crew! There is levity to that. I didn’t know that game existed. But from that point on, I did!! (laughs) Ever since then, I’ve been on the look-out for it! But that was my initiation! It was a bonding game. It is things like that that have always grounded sets with levity and humanity. We’re in it together and this is all a game! I have to say that is helpful to balance out those dark places. I do remember that I was game to go to those dark places. But after a while…it was not something I wanted to make a career of. It was super dark. That scene where I talk to him with him as he was being poisoned…where the character explains it, minute by minute. That was intense…and a little scary that I could just go there.

B: You have a very calm, serene quality in that scene. You made a very interesting choice to perform those moments with a chilling matter-of-factness.

L: Oh, just make it like…oh look what’s happening right now. Hmm…

B: Like the character was taking notes for the next novel!

L: This is going to happen. That is going to happen. As if it were nothing more than an experiment for me…like he was some sort of insect that I was experimenting on. That was kind of the feel of it. Yeah, you know, it was intense. It was intense.

B: It was almost like a 3 person play, each act of the episode. Did you spend a lot of time rehearsing with other actors to achieve that intimacy?

L: There was just the regular amount of time – which would be that day, the day of shooting. So, it certainly wasn’t like other projects, like theater projects where there would be six weeks of rehearsal. Film is like that. I had the different characters mapped out. I had a timeline in my head, a very strong sense of life and the work and everything. It’s important that you come to the table with the arc of where you’re going and that you keep track of your character, be mindful of where she’s going. They were very helpful with that, too. You just did it scene by scene…so it was the day of rehearsal type of thing. I guess I am so used to soap operas where there is no time, so any time that I get more than a couple of shots at it, I’m thinking that I’m indulging.

B: Interesting. Was there any one that you used as inspiration for Tania?

L: No. There was nobody that I can think of. If there was, I don’t remember. I just think that it was so far from me that I looked at it as an opportunity to play the flip side of the coin. It wasn’t who I was! Usually I’m the Midwestern “You’re so cute, stay that way!” type. When I grew up, everyone was telling me to stay cute. So, I think it was just the opportunity to play the shadow side of that. Let me be something that’s not cute! In a way, it might have been therapeutic, at the time. I was awfully young when I was doing that.

B: That’s the wonderful thing about the arts…you get to work those things out.

L: True! You get to play these little sub personalities. They’re maybe just a little part of you, but you get to expand them. They get to take over. They get to direct us. It’s kind of fun. It is fun! You know it’s not real. When I watched it now, I was a little – oof! – the lingerie and all that! It was a little creepy. And the 976 number. The fact that husband wanted me to do that to make money…I see where it just messed with her psyche…that he would want her to do that. I can’t…that is nobody that I would like to be married to.

B: Exactly! I found him questionable even in that beginning moment. He is totally uninterested in her, sexually, until she pretends to be someone else – a seductive stranger inviting him for a romp.

L: I saw that, too! It kind of filled me with rage. Wait a second! She comes down and makes it like it’s this clever surprise. Oh, my god! He thought it was somebody else! I guess she’s got some issues to work out, too! Yeah, that was really not a good foundation for a healthy marriage, I’d say.

B: Hence, Freddy was able to intervene with her…in whatever mystical and mysterious way that the producers and writers decide that he intervenes on the show!

L: True! It was an opening to intervene. That’s what it was! That’s what I thought. Here’s the opening for him to invade with that poison. They were open for it! This was not an empowering scenario for the woman.

B: Not at all! It kind of gave me Basic Instinct vibes – I checked the dates and this episode was done a number of years before that, though. You were ahead of the curve on that show!

L: Yeah! I was tapping into something else!

B: Is it surprising to you that all these years later that people like myself are still interested in this show and your work on it?

L: Yes…and no. I have found that I have been part of some shows that have just been iconic. I did an episode of Full House that, to this day, still makes my kids the most popular kids on campus. I was on this one episode where I kissed everybody. I was Jesse’s girlfriend…I was everybody’s girlfriend. So, I seemed to have hit on some shows that are now hitting the next wave of pop culture. There’s an obsession with it. My daughter is in her early 20s and she’s obsessed with ‘80s movies. I forget that they didn’t grow up with that. So, for them, they are seeing it with brand new eyes. So, I don’t know. I think that everything has its way of coming around. I’m curious what the Freddy’s Nightmares segment might find in it. Why is that its intriguing for you?

B: I’ve always looked at horror as reflecting the times we are living in and I think there is so much diversity in it. As a gay man and a self-described feminist, that is so important to me.  Despite an abundance of inadequacies, horror still has such strong female characters. Even with Kim/Tania in your episode. She kind of turns the tide and winds up being the one who revels in revenge and vengeance. It may be twisted in a way, but it’s still powerful.

L: Yes! it is twisted, but it’s a part of her that is taking over to protect her. She’s realized that what has happened to her – what her husband did to her – isn’t right. This was not right what happened. What you were supporting and suggesting and pushing me/her to do. It was like she was restoring a sense of justice – restoring her autonomy. It is a female comeuppance. Because it does make you cringe. I was cringing when I watched that relationship. It was like, “Oh, god!” And at the time, I didn’t know anything about relationships – so probably everything around me was dysfunctional. So, I was probably just like, yeah, yeah, yeah…this is it! It was a reflection of what you’ll accept and now the narrative is completely different! Thank god! Like my daughter would go, “That’s just crazy!!”

B: And she would be right.

L: Yeah! She would be right. In fact, when watching it I was like, “God, I hope my kids don’t see this!” I just forgot how creepy that part of it was. Then I was looking at it as this meaty role. I just got to play something completely different. It’s very interesting about how we change.

B: It is. I have a technical question now. There was some glass exploding in one of the bathroom scenes you are in. Do you recall how that was done to keep you safe?

L: Oh, there’s always stunt men. I was looking at that scene, too. I don’t even think I was there. I think they pulled me out when the glass was breaking. And there is a way that they shoot that kind of stuff. I’ve always found that fascinating. I love that stuff! That stuff is so much fun. I love the behind the scenes info – how they make the illusion happen. They make it look like I’m in it, but I’m not. It’s just a long shot. So, I don’t recall ever feeling in danger. It was a good crew. There is always some sort of stunt guy that protects you and it was probably special glass, too. Sugar glass…nothing that would cut you.

B: But you have cut your teeth on a strong variety of roles throughout your careers, a true testament to your talent.

L: Thank you. It was fun. I enjoyed playing different types of roles. I was very fearless about playing comedy. With Married…with Children, I was like, “I’ll go there!” I loved playing. I’m very good at looking at the tone of a show and I can match it. I can go big and I can go quiet. I find that very interesting, It’s just like playing different notes on a piano to me. I can go there!

B: Speaking of going there, Rising Storm, your big action film opus, is now available for viewing on YouTube.

L: It is? No kidding! Yeah. (laughs) That was going to make me a movie star. That was a lot of fun. June Chadwick, who played my sister, was just lovely. My character in that was Blaise March. I saw her as a cross between Goldie Hawn and Sigourney Weaver. That was where I was going with that. I just loved that – walking around with a machine gun! I had to run down a flight of stairs and, at the bottom of the stairs, I had to shoot this shotgun. I had to shoot a lock off. They basically said, “Just come down and shoot at it. Then we’ll cut and put in the special effects. That’ll be the shot of the lock being blown off, so don’t worry about it!” So, I came running down, pumped the gun and I shot at the lock and I blew it right off. I did it without any special effects! They couldn’t believe it. So, that was fun! I thought I was pretty bad-ass.

B: I have to agree with that assessment. I could never do that.

L: I had never done any work with guns before. So, I thought, “Oh, wow! I must be good at this! So, don’t give me a real one! I might like it!”

B: That’s what I think is so great about genre films…even as an exploitative genre, they have so much to offer women. Where else can someone play a bad-ass neurosurgeon with a vigilante fetish or a nuclear scientist-fashion model who saves the world? They are silly, but so powerful in their own way, as well.

L: I love that perspective. That’s great!

Speaking of great…you can always keep up with Liz’s amazing life and further ventures (including career coaching) at https://www.lizkeifer.com/.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

http://www.facebook.com/biggayhorrorfan

Hopelessly Devoted To: Gretchen Wyler

Published November 22, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

A year after Shirley MacLaine rocketeered to stardom, due to replacing an ailing Carol Haney in the original Broadway production of Pajama Game, the vibrant Gretchen Wyler (1932 – 2007) accomplished almost exactly the same thing with Cole Porter’s Silk Stockings. Wyler attacked the role of movie star Janice Clayton with such virtuoso power that she was promoted from second understudy to lead, almost overnight.

Nicely, this led this leggy wonder into to a distinguished career, full of stage and television efforts, including multiple stints on a variety of soap operas and situation comedies. Interestingly, for someone who often used her sex appeal as a vibrant component of her performing arsenal, one of her significant nighttime credits was as a guest star on Haunted Angels, a third season episode of the classic detective show that brought about the creation of the term “jiggle TV,” Charlie’s Angels.

Perhaps the most accomplished of several Angels’ plotlines that included horror genre elements, this venture found Wyler’s well-to-do Clare Rossmore requesting assistance from America’s favorite femme investigators due to the seeming ghostly reappearance of her long dead nephew. Adding to the gothic allure, Rossmore’s philanthropic countenance manifests itself in the form of a psychic research institute, an appropriate setting for a supernaturally charged murder to occur.

Of course, all is not as it seems, and as truths are revealed, Agatha Christie style, Wyler nestles nicely into an agreeable chemistry with David Doyle’s ever faithful Bosley. While this story features a rare, fun pairing between Kate Jackson’s Sabrina and Cheryl Ladd’s Kris, it is Doyle, a musical stage veteran himself, and Wyler who truly charm with a rare ease and joy.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Horror Mash-Up: West Side Waltz

Published October 5, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

I’ve always considered this site to be an homage to the interests of the gay men who came up in the generations before me. By doing this, my work here also almost functions as an apology of sorts. I can’t tell you the number of times that I rolled my eyes, during my rebellious college years, while some martini sipping elder gushed to me about the wonders of Connie Francis’ phrasing or the dynamic flare in Joan Crawford’s eyes while playing one of the many ambitious, conflicted women that she excelled in bringing to celluloid reality. Clutching my Patti Smith t-shirts to me like rosary beads, I vowed I would never be that kind of a gay man. But as the decades swirled past, I found myself drawn to the moody gothic antics of Bette Davis and Linda Darnell in films like Deception and This is My Love – often more so than with any of the contemporary, gut spewing epics that burst across the film festival screens at events that I attended with like-minded friends. Thus, one of the main focuses of this blog was to highlight the oddly spooky credits of those established queens of cinema. Now, I find, even when watching something a bit more mundane, I am, internally, cataloging the terror credits of the participants. (You might even find this game could come in handy whenever your significant other forces you to sit through another rom-com or slow moving domestic drama.)

Therefore, I was surprisingly delighted this past Sunday afternoon. After throwing in a dollar copy of the 1995 television film The West Side Waltz, the cinematic treatment of a popular play about two middle-aged spinster types finding renewed life due to their involvement with a hearty homeless woman and a young Bronx vamp, I realized that all the headlining divas (Kathy Bates, Jennifer Grey, Shirley MacLaine and Liza Minnelli) had some connection to the worlds of horror. Grandest of them all, perhaps, is Bates, who won the Academy Award for her enthusiastic performance as Annie Wilkes in Misery. Meanwhile, fellow Oscar winner MacLaine starred in 1972’s authentically effective The Possession of Joel Delaney, a film that might have cost her the lead in The Exorcist due to the similarity of the two projects. Less distinguished than those projects, perhaps, was Grey’s leading turn in Ritual, a still fun film that mixes the steamy, old school jungle melodrama of I Walked with a Zombie with another mighty performance from the legendary Tim Curry. Minnelli’s connections to the field, meanwhile, are more musically related. Famously, she sang back-up for shock rock legend Alice Cooper on his Muscle of Love effort while offering up a totally recognizable solo on the track Mama from My Chemical Romance’s The Black Parade – proof of the power of her own Oscar winning status.

Meanwhile, true crime aficionados may find a connection with this particular title, as well. Co-star Robert Pastorelli, who brings the same kind of goofy energy here as he did with his popular long term role on the original Murphy Brown, was highlighted as a prime suspect in the suspicious (real life) gunshot death of his girlfriend in 1999. The reopening of the case in 2002 is rumored to be a possible reason why Pastorelli was found dead of a morphine overdose that year. Hmm…you just never know what you might find within the confines of a filmic adaptation of a Broadway play, right?!

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE. Big Gay Horror Fan

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Va-Va-Villainess: Melissa Sue Anderson

Published August 29, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

After years of playing the overburdened Mary Ingalls on Little House on the Prairie, securing herself a Leading Actress Emmy nomination at the age of 16 along the way, Melissa Sue Anderson, understandably wanted to branch out. With a daring pixie cut, quite the opposite of Mary’s angelic country tresses, Anderson took on the role of Vivian Sotherland, a (very bad) witch in training, in 1981’s truly enjoyable television film Midnight Offerings.

With a glint in her eye and venom dripping from her voice, Anderson obviously reveled in playing a person who was happy to torture her romantic rival – here another (shiningly nice) witch in training, played, in perfect stunt casting style, by The Waltons’ Mary McDonough.

In Hooray for Homicide, a first season episode of Murder, She Wrote, Anderson also explored darker worlds as starlet Eve Crystal. Here, though, her crimes are almost accidental. Thus, all of Anderson/Crystal’s manipulations and cover-ups are born out of soft sorrow and regret – a situation that Anderson displays at the episode’s denouement with a downcast tone in her voice and teary sorrow in her eyes.

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Horror Hall of Fame:

Of course, true terror stalwarts know that Anderson’s most famous attempt at ripping off those calico dresses occurred with Happy Birthday to Me, the now classic 1981 slasher film. The film’s iconic tagline boasted of a celluloid delight that featured “six of the most bizarre murders that you will ever see,” but fans of women in horror will always appreciate Anderson’s quietly mysterious performance. Although, ultimately a red herring, here she makes you believe that her character just might be responsible for all the bloodshed at hand – a nice feat of acting prowess, indeed.

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and she didn’t even notice the shirt! As a kid I had a wall covered with the posters of the actors that I dreamed of working with one day. Melissa Sue Anderson was one of them. While on a 2010 book store tour for her memoir, Anderson would ask for audience members to read with her. While not exactly primetime television…I guess that I can check that hope off of the bucket list…

Va-Va-Villainess: Carol Veazie

Published July 11, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

Carol Veazie (1895-1984) was one of those formidable character actresses who enlivened the proceedings of many celluloid outings – often in smaller roles. Thankfully, television was a bit kinder to her, allowing her to shine on such classic programs as McHale’s Navy and The Girl from U.N.C.L.E. In particular, the producers of The Loretta Young Show seemed to recognize her magnificent presence and, in appreciation thereof, gave her a role to match her talents in a 4th season episode of the popular anthology series called Wedding Day.

Here, as the regal Jessica Vail, Veazie is given many colors to play. As the prime confident to Young’s aristocratic Muriel, this established performer initially radiates with compassion and concern as her young charge seems to be losing her grip on reality. But, as Muriel struggles to come to terms with the supposed death of her fiancée, Veazie begins to let sharper, darker hues characterize her work here.

Indeed, by the end of the episode, Jessica has turned on Muriel with a diabolic fervor and our featured performer almost gleefully relishes all the opportunities she has to play a woman driven to desperate circumstances by uncontrollable greed and a vengeful mindset.

Of course, Veazie, who had already made an appearance on Alfred Hitchcock Presents (below), was no stranger to gothic enterprises. Nicely, she ultimately rounded her career out by appearing on an episode of Kolcahak: The Night Stalker, as well.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Unsung Heroines of Horror: Virginia Mayo

Published June 6, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

Perhaps only rivalled, credit-wise, by Yvonne De Carlo, her luscious raven haired cinematic counterpart, the delicious Virginia Mayo spent the moonlight years of her career occupying space in a number of horror projects. Granted, with major roles in projects like Silent Scream, Cellar Dweller, American Gothic and Play Dead (along with her overpowering The Munsters cache), De Carlo was certainly the Queen Bee of the Former Technicolor Starlets set. But Mayo definitely gave her a run for her money. 

While the ’60s and ’70s found Mayo decorating such cinematic fare as Castle of Evil (1966) and Haunted (1977) (with 1990 cheapie Evil Spirits providing her employment during the VHS invasion), she is perhaps at her most effective (and eternally beautiful) as the sympathetic Carrie Crane in The Diary (1971), a second season episode of Rod Serling’s early ’70s spook show Night Gallery. As Crane, a faded, scandal plagued actress, Mayo radiates with a bruised and tender strength of purpose here. Digging her shiny yet well-trod heels into her scenes with Patty Duke’s venomous Holly Schaeffer, a gossip journalist who is out to destroy her, Mayo’s years in the Hollywood trenches are given a resourceful workout during the various character beats in this revenge fueled tale. 

Indeed, Crane’s gifting of a mysterious journal to Schaeffer soon sends that pesky muckracker into a gothic downward spiral full of death and despair – proving what many diva-worshipping fellas already know, that Mayo will forever be a prominent force in every style of cinema – terror fueled and otherwise.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Shark Bait Retro Village: As The World Turns (The Willows)

Published May 9, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

From satanic possessions and trouble making clones to distressed heroines being buried alive, daytime dramas have been utilizing elements from horror (and science fiction) novels and films for decades. During the ’60s and ’70s (and into the ’80s and ’90s), their daily format also bested all suspenseful movie of the week offerings by being able to truly concentrate on in depth plotlines that often took months to unfold. This, ultimately, allowed for layered character development and truly intense homages to other works. As a specific case in point, the classic Procter and Gamble soap As The World Turns, carried out an elaborate reconstruction of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca throughout the many months of 1979.

Here, though, it was Eileen Fulton’s worldly and often notorious villainess Lisa who was offered up as the stand-in for du Maurier’s innocent Mrs. de Winter. Known for her romantic manipulations, often involving the show’s steadfast Dr. Bob, this long running antagonist found herself on the receiving end of some dark and stormy conniving during this gothic adventure which, proudly and lovingly, carried the huge imprint of its source material. 

Finding romance with a seemingly kind, but often volatile author named Bennett (Doug Higgins), Lisa ventured away from Oakdale, the standard suburban setting of the melodrama, and settled into a remote country lodge known as The Willows with her new paramour. But Hester (Ann Stanchfield), Bennett’s demandingly loyal housekeeper, and the mystery surrounding the disappearance of Ruth, Bennett’s adulterous former wife, almost immediately started playing havoc with the new calm in this beloved anti-heroine’s life. Slashed family portraits, hidden hallways and candle drenched evenings soon became the norm for her – and as marriage bells started to knoll for this hopeful yet mismatched twosome, acquaintances, including one of Bennett’s publishing buddies, began to meet their bloody ends. 

With the serial’s writing staff smartly playing up the fact that either suspected party – Bennett, a man capable of blind rages and compulsive jealousies, and Hester, a woman radiating with a quiet and shrewd devotion to her handsome employer – could be the one responsible for trying to secretly dispatch with one of its most popular creations, Fulton was able to add softer layers to her often acerbic character. Radiating with curiosity, fear and sorrow, she encapsulated why audiences developed such a strong attachment to her nuanced dramatis personae, a situation that continued until the show’s sad ending in September of 2010. 

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Va-Va-Villainess: Agnes Moorehead

Published April 4, 2021 by biggayhorrorfan

Noted for her acerbic antagonism as Endora on Bewitched, arguably her most famous role, the significant, always striking Agnes Moorehead resonated with a much more slithery, maliciously evil context in the noted 1947 film noir Dark Passage. Indeed, Madge Rapf, the character portrayed by Moorehead, undermines and manipulates the lives of Humphrey Bogart’s maligned Vincent and Lauren Bacall’s overly supportive Irene with such devious finesse that, even at the film’s semi-happy fade-out, their lives have been irreparably altered by her sadistic manipulations.

In fact, with the strategic aid of Bernard Newman’s glorious costumes, Moorehead’s Rapf may be one of celluloid’s most notoriously nasty characters. And while some casual fans may be surprised at the ferocious energy that she ultimately exhibits here, she is definitely this film’s most uninhibited pleasure.

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Horror Hall of Fame:

With credits like The Bat, Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte, Night Gallery and Dear Dead Delilah, this one of a kind performer has irrevocably earned her stripes as a dignified goddess of terror, as well.


Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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